Salman Ahmed questions Pakistani establishment

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Top Pakistani musician Salman Ahemd has hailed Osama bin Laden’s death as a victory for the Islamic world and has questioned Pakistani establishment on how the Al-Qaeda chief lived in his country for years.

The rock star, whose band ‘Junoon’ is one of the most popular rock band in South Asia, said Pakistanis felt ‘humiliated’ that the world’s most-wanted man resided in the town of Abbottabad.

Ahmed, who recently performed in Washington, told AFP, "In the last 1,400 years of Islamic history, there has rarely been a man or woman — Muslim or non-Muslim — who has caused more damage to Muslims around the world than Osama bin Laden,"

Ahmed questions Pakistani intelligence, military and establishment on how bin Laden lived a stone’s throw from Pakistan’s top military academy and why he apparently felt safe enough to maintain minimum protection.

Ahmad is not a newcomer to the issue. In the 1990s, Pakistani television banned Junoon’s song "Ehtesaab", whose accompanying video mercilessly mocked corruption by the country’s leaders.

Top Pakistani musician Salman Ahemd has hailed Osama bin Laden’s death as a victory for the Islamic world and has questioned Pakistani establishment on how the Al-Qaeda chief lived in his country for years.

Top Pakistani musician Salman Ahemd has hailed Osama bin Laden’s death as a victory for the Islamic world and has questioned Pakistani establishment on how the Al-Qaeda chief lived in his country for years.

The rock star, whose band ‘Junoon’ is one of the most popular rock band in South Asia, said Pakistanis felt ‘humiliated’ that the world’s most-wanted man resided in the town of Abbottabad.

Ahmed, who recently performed in Washington, told AFP, "In the last 1,400 years of Islamic history, there has rarely been a man or woman -- Muslim or non-Muslim -- who has caused more damage to Muslims around the world than Osama bin Laden,"

Ahmed questions Pakistani intelligence, military and establishment on how bin Laden lived a stone’s throw from Pakistan’s top military academy and why he apparently felt safe enough to maintain minimum protection.

Ahmad is not a newcomer to the issue. In the 1990s, Pakistani television banned Junoon's song "Ehtesaab", whose accompanying video mercilessly mocked corruption by the country's leaders.

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